Final Fantasy meets trance music

Discussion in 'Main Forum' started by Prometheus, Oct 28, 2011.

  1. Prometheus

    Prometheus Administrator Staff Member

    I've posted this before but this is still one of the best amateur videos I've ever seen. The editing is superb. Most people just throw in background music to accompany a video, or play random video footage to accompany a music track. But this one does a good job of making the music and video come togther into a unified whole. Gold star award. :)



    In the forest
    There's a monster
    And he looks so
    Very much like me
     
  2. Prometheus

    Prometheus Administrator Staff Member

    Wow, a trance track with over 110 129 163 million views? What's the world coming to? Maybe some of you who have no idea what trance is should venture a listen:



    Just a thought.

    Actually, on second thought, if you like country, don't bother. You have been warned. ;)
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2016
  3. Ozgrom

    Ozgrom Member

    It actually reminds of the 80s...
     
  4. Prometheus

    Prometheus Administrator Staff Member

    Yes, quite similar. It has a lot to do with our musical culture, I think. We heard more music influenced by or directly from northern Europe in the 80's, across several genres. For instance, U2, Depeche Mode, The Cure, Duran Duran, A-ha, Pet Shop Boys, Def Lepard, Thomas Dolby, Eurhythmics (and Annie Lennox), The Police (and Sting), Dead or Alive, Tears For Fears, The Smiths (and Morrissey), Human League, Billy Idol, Go Go's, Erasure, Thompson Twins, Simple Minds -- all of them are from Northern Europe... in fact, most of those I just listed are from the UK alone. There were good bands from the US too, but back then we heard a broader pallette of musical styles we listened to and had a more lively music culture.

    For some reason that I don't fully understand, the US more or less quit listening to most (although not all) European music in the 90s and thus lost touch with it. In part, the US just doesn't have as much of a dance club culture as northern Europe, but the rest I don't understand. Especially 80'ish dance music more or less continued to evolve in mostly European clubs (and some big city US "underground" clubs), but it sort of split into multiple subgenres including house, trance, breakbeat, ambient, industrial, progressive, and others. So it was still "out there" and evolving, but not heard in the US much.

    Armin van Buuren is one of the most famous DJs in the world, but he's Dutch, so chances are you've never heard of him. Not to sound too cynical, but it is nevertheless my honest view that the US music industry has a virtual stranglehold on what we hear on the radio here, and they are only interested in using music to promote an image they can market, which in my view is very different from promoting music itself.

    So I often listen to Digitally Imported (di.fm) simply to escape the commercial blockade.

    Isn't that more than you wanted to know? :)
     
  5. Ozgrom

    Ozgrom Member

    I am not much of a music person. In fact most of the time I ignore the lyrics all together.

    But, on Monday nights I do a little pencil and paper gaming and we have discussed several of your points well into the evening.
    Mostly they will bring up a little known genre and I will complain that mass media makes it difficult for me, the below average consumer, to learn about new bands, styles, genres, etc. and that will get us going.

    On a side note your link led to me installing WinAmp... prompting more memories from my youth. Interesting.
     
  6. Prometheus

    Prometheus Administrator Staff Member

    In case anyone is interested, here is a song I've been working on:

    Sanctuary Remix (wma format)

    For those who just hate wma format, here is an mp3 of the same thing but it's a bigger file and very slightly lower quality besides: Sanctuary Remix mp3

    I only edited this track -- A very talented fellow from England named Gareth Emery made the original. The original follows a baroque music motif of starting very simply and adding more layers of complexity as the song progresses (this is sometimes called "progressive" style in modern jargon, but the idea is at least 350 years old). What I did was rearrange it in a more classical/romantic era style, where the main theme is presented right up front, partially abandoned for a while, then returned to in the end.

    I also remastered it a little, mostly softening the edges of the percussion slightly to emphasize the melodic portions more. I'm not especially fond of the vocals, but I like the main theme quite a bit. The best part is the section from 2:19 to 4:16 in my opinion.
     
  7. Prometheus

    Prometheus Administrator Staff Member

    I re-edited the Sanctuary Remix and made some minor improvements. Previously there was an audio hiccup at 1:52, but it is fixed now. The wma format version is somewhat higher quality (96 KHz, 24 bit) compared to the mp3 (44.1 KHz, 16 bit), but I doubt you'll hear any difference at all. With $250 headphones, I can hear some slight distortion near the 6:00 mark in the mp3... maybe, but it's minimal. Basically, one is DVD quality and one is CD quality. However, if you just click the link and let it play, you may hear buffering glitches (short gaps with no sound), but if you download it first then play it, you shouldn't hear any gaps in audio. In fact, if you do, let me know, and I'll check it out.
     
  8. Prometheus

    Prometheus Administrator Staff Member

    A pleasantly creepy video for Halloween, some progressive trance by Armin Van Buuren. Take a look.



    I think I like her better in black.

    Notes for the musically curious: "progressive" just means it starts out with only a few instruments and then weaves in more before building up to the main theme. Similarly the end of the track gradually drops out voices / instruments. Also, starting at 0:39, he gradually starts opening a low pass filter, which makes the sound increasing "bright" and noisy. That keeps opening until it peaks at 1:08, and then he abruptly closes the filter to get back to a tamer, more muffled sound. If you listen, you'll hear him do it again starting at 1:23. Later on (at 4:05) there's a filter "sweep", which has a distinctive sound. Almost all music today, regardless of genre, uses some sort of sound filtering as part of their production process.
     
  9. Prometheus

    Prometheus Administrator Staff Member

    Yay. One of my favorite DJ's, Gareth Emery, made a track that got voted #1 track of year by A State of Trance. Here it is:



    Cool track. I like the sound levels in the building windows.

    Does anyone know what city that is in the background? It's driving me crazy because it seems familiar but I cannot place it. Gareth is from the UK, so I originally assumed it was in England, but the palm trees and the mountains in the background thoroughly rule that out. Also, the roads look like US freeways, so it's probably someplace in the Southwestern US, possibly California, but I cannot place where.

    [Nov 13, 2013]

    Also found and acoustic version, which brings out more of the melodic parts to the song. It deserved track of the year. Just a shame mainstream radio ignores this stuff:



    Let me breathe you in,
    And breathe the words in your mouth.
    Inside your shivering,
    The silence shouts so loud.
    I just want to,
    I just want to stay around.
    While my heart beats,
    I promise I won't let you down.

    [In acoustic version only:]
    If you keep building these walls,
    Brick by brick towers so tall,
    Soon I won't see you at all,
    'Til the concrete angel falls.

    I knew how you were from the start,
    But now I don't know who you are.
    Soon there'll be nothing at all,
    'Til the concrete angel falls.

    ------------------------------------------

    If I'm somewhere else,
    It doesn't mean that I don't see
    That you don't trust yourself --
    That's why you don't trust me.
    It makes me crazy:
    When you're crazy, you don't speak.
    You think you know me,
    But what you know is just skin deep.

    If you keep building these walls,
    Brick by brick towers so tall,
    Soon I won't see you at all,
    'Til the concrete angel falls.

    I knew how you were from the start,
    But now I don't know who you are.
    Soon there'll be nothing at all,
    'Til the concrete angel falls.

    ------------------------------------------

    [In acoustic version only:]
    It's twisting your mind.
    I'm not getting through,
    'Cause I don't see it like you do.
    There's nothing to find.
    You've got no excuse.
    I'm over getting over you.
    Over getting over you,
    'Cause I don't see it like you do.
    I'm over getting over you.
    I'm over getting over you.

    If you keep building these walls,
    Brick by brick towers so tall,
    Soon I won't see you at all,
    'Til the concrete angel falls.

    I knew how you were from the start,
    But now I don't know who you are.
    Soon there'll be nothing at all,
    'Til the concrete angel falls.
     
  10. Mornak

    Mornak Member

    Hmmmm, hadn't heard of Sunscreem before, but after watching to the video from the top of the page, I'll be buying/downloading some tracks tonight. I have always liked this kind of music. Some of my favorites are Tieso (older stuff anyway), Dash Berlin, Armin Van Buuren, Sean Tyas, Sophie Sugar, Talla 2XLC, and plenty of others. I have way too many podcasts downloaded but am always listening to something. Thanks for the tip on Sunscreem.
     
  11. Prometheus

    Prometheus Administrator Staff Member

    To the best of my knowledge, Sunscreem has not done anything lately. Most of what I know from them is late 90s to early 2000s. Based on the names you mentioned (all of which are good), you might also want to check out:
    • Paul Oakenfold. He's a famous British DJ and producer who has done a ton, including the soundtrack for Swordfish, but check out Southern Sun for a pretty representative track. His albums from the 90s are all considered classic trance. I own several of his CDs.
    • Paul Van Dyk. German. More famous in the 90s but he still does good stuff. Let Go is fairly recent, for instance. For An Angel is extremely famous and almost universally liked. I also have several of his CDs.
    • BT. From Maryland, went to Berklee College of Music and trained in classical music. Very talented guy who collaborates with lots of other artists. Hard to describe his style, but it's more experimental and symphonic sounding. His most famous tracks are probably Flaming June and Somnambulist.
    • Gareth Emery, who I mentioned previously, has become more known recently but his earlier tracks Exposure and More Than Anything are probably still my favorites.
    • Way Out West is a little known duo from southwestern England that consistently puts out good stuff that is often picked up by others and remixed. Mind Circus got me hooked on them, and Killa is amazing.
    • Solarstone (http://www.solarstone.co.uk), a british group that has put out tracks under various other names as well, mostly in the late 90s, early 2000s. Their style is a bit more slow and brooding, almost entirely instrumental, with heavy bass admixed with ethereal ambient elements. Seven Cities is probably their most classic tune, but they've actually done quite a lot of fairly different sounding tracks.
    I could go on, but that's enough for now. ;)

    [12-21-13 Edit: Fixed broken link to Mind Circus]
     
  12. Prometheus

    Prometheus Administrator Staff Member

    Ok, this is classic 80's, but the impressive thing to me is the quality of the audio. A lot of posted videos on YouTube and elsewhere have pretty crappy audio quality, but even on nice headphones, the sound quality on this is great. Amazing how well produced many 80's tunes were. Since then we've become too interested in distortion and "gritty" sounds, I think.

     
  13. Ozgrom

    Ozgrom Member

    Ya know, it isn't really something I ever thought of but it is quite clear and modern sounding.
    If it weren't for the style you couldn't tell it was almost a 30 year old song.... now I feel old.
     
  14. Prometheus

    Prometheus Administrator Staff Member

    Lol. You and me both! :) I remember when that song came out. Everyone thought it was cool but quite weird (have you ever seen the video?! Someone was on drugs). No one would guess it would be so well-known 30 years later.

    And just because I know you want it, here is a link to the original music video. What is wrong with that girl?!
     
  15. Prometheus

    Prometheus Administrator Staff Member

    How about some progressive (mostly) instrumental trance and some nice artwork to go along with it?



    It's a classic trance track from several years ago, made famous by its inclusion on DJ Tiësto's popular (and very good) compilation album, Nyana. I've walked into Best Buy and heard them playing Nyana even. I own the CD. However, the only impulse buy I've ever made of a music album was a different Tiësto album, In Search of Sunrise 3: Panama. I heard that entire album played on Digitally Imported (I love that they do whole albums and not just singles all the time), and by the time track 11 came around, I was like "Wow, this is a really good album", but by track 13, I was "That's it -- I gotta have it", and I bought it online immediately. I never regretted that purchase. It's an amazing mix that I highly recommend.

    Unlike most people, I prefer music over lyrics. It's not that I hate good singing or meaningful lyrics, but too often songs are mostly lyrics with just some rather typical and predictable music to accompany the lyrics. I think it should be just the opposite: Songs should be mostly about the music, with any singing or lyrics as just another instrument among the many that weave together to form the song. Most of the great works of classical composers like Beethoven, Bach, and others were purely music without anyone singing at all. Many good mostly or purely instrumental songs are being produced today as well -- you just do not hear them on most radio stations.

    But if you like instrumental tracks, here are a couple other more hardcore trance tracks I like:
    1. DJ Andy Moor's remix of Transatlantic by Jose Zamora & Damian DP feat. Paleday
    2. Wave Force by Perry O'Neil
    Both those sound a lot better with a good pair of headphones, since there is a lot going on sound-wise. Bad headphones kind of mush the sounds together into a sonic sludge. I like AKG, but any good headphones will do.

    Enjoy! :cool:
     
  16. Prometheus

    Prometheus Administrator Staff Member

    So the past month or so has seen some very good new vocal trance tracks. This first one is rapidly becoming one of my favorite tracks of the year:



    "The more we keep trying, just keeps getting worse..."

    Love that part... interesting transition musically. Plus, not only does it apply to many relationships, it also aptly describes many raids I've been to. ;)

    If you like that, there's a harder remix too, Venom One feat. Adina Butar - Crashed & Burned (Rafael Frost Remix). It nicely juxtaposes the freight train + dream state combination that to me defines the trance genre. I slightly prefer this Refael Frost remix, but it is more hardcore and less mainstream than the Markus Schulz remix.

    A second new vocal trance is this one:



    It's not quite as good, imo, but the vocal section starting at 0:55 is brilliant, especially from 1:09 to 1:25. Nice equalizer effect on the top of the video too.
     
  17. Prometheus

    Prometheus Administrator Staff Member

    Proof that the human voice can be a very versatile instrument:



    Their bass and percussion is mind blowing.

    And forget the blue eyes -- I want to know where they got those sunglasses.
     
  18. Prometheus

    Prometheus Administrator Staff Member

    Here's a pretty good example of so-called "melodic" trance:



    If you listen you can understand why. It's a little more dream state and a little less freight train compared to other trance, and generally has a non-screaming riff with a relatively subdued instrument, such as piano, strings, acoustic guitar, etc. Usually the melody is played in legato (flowing together) style as well. When done right, the mix of both gentle and harsh tones is often much more appealing than a song that is either gentle or harsh throughout.

    Edit September 2017:
    I neglected to note that this song got voted #1 track of year in 2010 by A State of Trance.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2017
  19. Mornak

    Mornak Member

    I showed my wife and kids this Pentatonix video (the Daft Punk video posted above) and others from them a few days ago. They have a nice version of Little Drummer Boy, , that I really enjoyed. I find it amazing, powerful, and emotional. There were several other acapella pieces that were also very good. I really enjoy a good acapella song!

    I like this last video too. I'm gonna have to check out more work from Yuri Kane when I get home tonight.
     
  20. Mornak

    Mornak Member

    Also, I went ahead and ordered the newer Sophie Sugar CD for myself a couple days ago. She is another trance artist that I have really enjoyed over the past several years. Some of my favorites from her are Call of Tomorrow, Redemption, and Fallen Too Far, and Together.
     

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